Self-affirmation effects on doping related cognition among exercisers who use nutritional supplements

BARKOUKIS, Vassilis, ROWE, Richard, HARRIS, Peter and LAZURAS, Lambros (2019). Self-affirmation effects on doping related cognition among exercisers who use nutritional supplements. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 46, p. 101609.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.101609

Abstract

Objectives The use of nutritional supplements has been associated with stronger doping intentions and actual use of doping substances, but there is limited research about doping risk communication among nutritional supplement users. The present study examined if using a self-affirmation manipulation a) changes intentions to use doping and b) influences related social cognitions (i.e., attitudes, social and moral norms, self-efficacy and situational temptation, and anticipated regret) among exercisers who use nutritional supplements, following a brief exposure to doping-related health risk messages. Design Between subjects experimental design. Method Sixty exercisers were randomly assigned to self-affirmation and control groups and completed a structured and anonymous questionnaire about doping intentions and related social cognitive variables. Results Self-affirmed participants reported higher scores in descriptive and moral norms and anticipated regret towards using doping substances, than control participants. Doping intentions were predicted by situational temptation and anticipated regret. Anticipated regret mediated the effect of the self-affirmation manipulation on doping intentions. Conclusions In the context of doping risk communication, self-affirmation may influence the decision-making process by acting on anticipated regret. Our findings can inform risk communication campaigns targeting exercisers who use nutritional supplements.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** Article version: AM ** Embargo end date: 31-12-9999 ** From Elsevier via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for AM version of this article: This article is under embargo with an end date yet to be finalised. **Journal IDs: issn 14690292 **History: issue date 25-10-2019; accepted 22-10-2019
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.101609
Page Range: p. 101609
SWORD Depositor: Helen Garner
Depositing User: Helen Garner
Date Deposited: 28 Oct 2019 17:21
Last Modified: 11 Nov 2019 15:15
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/25356

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