Exploration of the factors influencing attitudes to breastfeeding in public

MORRIS, Cecile, SCHOFIELD, Peter and HIRST, Craig (2019). Exploration of the factors influencing attitudes to breastfeeding in public. Journal of Human Lactation.

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Official URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0890...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1177/0890334419878119
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    Abstract

    Background: Negative attitudes towards breastfeeding in public have consistently been identified as a key barrier to breastfeeding continuation. In order to design effective social marketing campaigns to improve public attitude towards breastfeeding in public, it is critical to identify segments of the population who are less likely to support this activity, their underlying reasons and the medium through which they can be reached. Research aim/question(s): The aims were to identify the underlying dimensions that drive acceptance or opposition to breastfeeding in public; test whether specific population segments were more or less likely to support breastfeeding in public and identify suitable media outlets to reach them. Methods: A cross-sectional survey testing agreement with 60 statements was administered online between May 2016 and May 2017 and was completed by 7190 respondents. Exploratory Factor Analysis was used to identify 12 dimensions driving acceptance or opposition to breastfeeding in public. The influence of demographics and media consumption on attitudes towards breastfeeding in public was tested using Welch's t-tests and one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA). Results: Acceptance of breastfeeding in public was found to differ with gender, age, religion, parental and breastfeeding status, but not household income. Support for breastfeeding in public also varied with media consumption habits. Conclusion(s): This work lays the foundation to design effective social marketing campaigns aimed at increasing public support for breastfeeding in public.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Pediatrics; 1103 Clinical Sciences; 1110 Nursing; 1117 Public Health and Health Services
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1177/0890334419878119
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 10 Sep 2019 09:21
    Last Modified: 22 Oct 2019 10:03
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/25089

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