The potential of recreational mathematics to support the development of mathematical learning

ROWLETT, Peter, SMITH, Edward, CORNER, Alexander, O'SULLIVAN, David and WALDOCK, Jeff (2019). The potential of recreational mathematics to support the development of mathematical learning. International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology.

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Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00207...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/0020739X.2019.1657596

Abstract

A literature review establishes a working definition of recreational mathematics: a type of play which is enjoyable and requires mathematical thinking or skills to engage with. Typically, it is accessible to a wide range of people and can be effectively used to motivate engagement with and develop understanding of mathematical ideas or concepts. Recreational mathematics can be used in education for engagement and to develop mathematical skills, to maintain interest during procedural practise and to challenge and stretch students. It can also make cross-curricular links, including to history of mathematics. In undergraduate study, recreational mathematics can be used for engagement within standard curricula and for extra-curricular interest. Beyond this, there are opportunities to develop important graduate-level skills in problem-solving and communication. The development of a module ‘Game Theory and Recreational Mathematics’ is discussed. This provides an opportunity for fun and play, while developing graduate skills. It teaches some combinatorics, graph theory, game theory and algorithms/complexity, as well as scaffolding a Pólya-style problem-solving process. The assessment of problem-solving as a process via examination is outlined. Student feedback gives some indication that students appreciate the aims of the module, benefit from the explicit focus on problem-solving and understand the active nature of the learning.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Department of Engineering and Mathematics; Centre for Automation and Robotics Research; 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy; Education
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/0020739X.2019.1657596
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 20 Aug 2019 09:00
Last Modified: 10 Sep 2019 09:57
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/25024

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