Stressors, Appraisal of Stressors, Experienced Stress and Cardiac Response: A Real-Time, Real-Life Investigation of Work Stress in Nurses

JOHNSTON, D., BELL, C., JONES, M., FARQUHARSON, B., ALLAN, J., SCHOFIELD, Patricia, RICKETTS, I. and JOHNSTON, M. (2016). Stressors, Appraisal of Stressors, Experienced Stress and Cardiac Response: A Real-Time, Real-Life Investigation of Work Stress in Nurses. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 50 (2), 187-197.

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Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/abm/article/50/2/187/4296...
Open Access URL: https://watermark.silverchair.com/12160_2015_artic... (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-015-9746-8
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    Abstract

    © 2015, The Author(s). Background: Stress in health care professionals may reflect both the work and appraisal of work and impacts on the individuals, their patients, colleagues and managers. Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to examine physiological and psychological effects of stressors (tasks) and theory-based perceptions of work stressors within and between nurses in real time. Methods: During two work shifts, 100 nurses rated experienced stress, affect, fatigue, theory-based measures of work stress and nursing tasks on electronic diaries every 90 min, whereas heart rate and activity were measured continuously. Results: Heart rate was associated with both demand and effort. Experienced stress was related to demand, control, effort and reward. Effort and reward interacted as predicted (but only within people). Results were unchanged when allowance was made for work tasks. Conclusions: Real-time appraisals were more important than actual tasks in predicting both psychological and physiological correlates of stress. At times when effort was high, perceived reward reduced stress.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Demand-control model; Ecological momentary assessment; Effort-reward imbalance; Heart rate; Occupational stress; Adult; Affect; Female; Heart Rate; Humans; Job Satisfaction; Male; Middle Aged; Nurses; Nursing; Occupational Health; Reward; Stress, Psychological; Workplace; Humans; Stress, Psychological; Affect; Reward; Job Satisfaction; Nursing; Heart Rate; Adult; Middle Aged; Nurses; Occupational Health; Workplace; Female; Male; 11 Medical and Health Sciences; 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences; 13 Education; Public Health
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-015-9746-8
    Page Range: 187-197
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 15 May 2020 11:59
    Last Modified: 15 May 2020 12:00
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/24817

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