Lifetime self-reported arthritis is associated with elevated levels of mental health burden: a multi-national cross sectional study across 46 low-and middle-income countries

STUBBS, B, VERONESE, N, VANCAMPFORT, D, THOMPSON, T, KOHLER, C, SCHOFIELD, Patricia, SOLMI, M, MUGISHA, J, KAHL, KG, PILLINGER, T, CARVALHO, AF and KOYANAGI, A (2017). Lifetime self-reported arthritis is associated with elevated levels of mental health burden: a multi-national cross sectional study across 46 low-and middle-income countries. Scientific Reports, 7 (1), p. 7138.

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Official URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-07688-6
Open Access URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-07688-6... (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-07688-6
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    Abstract

    Population-based studies investigating the relationship of arthritis with mental health outcomes are lacking, particularly among low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). We investigated the relationship between arthritis and mental health (depression spectrum, psychosis spectrum, anxiety, sleep disturbances and stress) across community-dwelling adults aged ≥18 years across 46 countries from the World Health Survey. Symptoms of psychosis and depression were established using questions from the Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Severity of anxiety, sleep problems, and stress sensitivity over the preceding 30 days were self-reported. Self-report lifetime history of arthritis was collected, including presence or absence of symptoms suggestive of arthritis: pain, stiffness or swelling of joints over the preceding 12-months. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were undertaken. Overall, 245,706 individuals were included. Having arthritis increased the odds of subclinical psychosis (OR = 1.85; 95%CI = 1.72-1.99) and psychosis (OR = 2.48; 95%CI = 2.05-3.01). People with arthritis were at increased odds of subsyndromal depression (OR = 1.92; 95%CI = 1.64-2.26), a brief depressive episode (OR = 2.14; 95%CI = 1.88-2.43) or depressive episode (OR = 2.43; 95%CI = 2.21-2.67). Arthritis was also associated with increased odds for anxiety (OR = 1.75; 95%CI = 1.63-1.88), sleep problems (OR = 2.23; 95%CI = 2.05-2.43) and perceived stress (OR = 1.43; 95%CI = 1.33-1.53). Results were similar for middle-income and low-income countries. Integrated interventions addressing arthritis and mental health comorbidities are warranted to tackle this considerable burden.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Adult; Arthritis; Comorbidity; Cross-Sectional Studies; Developing Countries; Female; Global Health; Humans; Income; Male; Mental Health; Middle Aged; Odds Ratio; Prevalence; Public Health Surveillance; Self Report; Social Class; Young Adult; Humans; Arthritis; Prevalence; Odds Ratio; Cross-Sectional Studies; Mental Health; Comorbidity; Developing Countries; Social Class; Adult; Middle Aged; Income; Female; Male; Young Adult; Self Report; Public Health Surveillance; Global Health
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-07688-6
    Page Range: p. 7138
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 18 Dec 2019 12:57
    Last Modified: 18 Dec 2019 13:00
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/24778

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