Reducing pain during wound dressings in burn care using virtual reality: a study of perceived impact and usability with patients and nurses.

FURNESS, Penelope, PHELAN, Ivan, BABIKER, Nathan, FEHILY, Orla, THOMPSON, Andrew and LINDLEY, Shirley (2019). Reducing pain during wound dressings in burn care using virtual reality: a study of perceived impact and usability with patients and nurses. Journal of Burn Care & Research, 40 (6), 878-885.

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Official URL: https://academic.oup.com/jbcr/article/40/6/878/551...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1093/jbcr/irz106
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    Abstract

    Burns patients often suffer severe pain during interventions such as dressing changes, even with analgesia. Virtual Reality (VR) can be used to distract patients and reduce pain. However, more evidence is needed from the patients and staff using the technology about its use in clinical practice and the impact of different VR strategies. This small-scale qualitative study explored patient and staff perceptions of the impact and usability of active and passive VR during painful dressing changes. Five patients took part in three observed dressing changes - one with an active VR scenario developed for the study, one with passive VR and one with no VR - following which they were interviewed about their experiences. Three nurses who performed the dressing changes participated in a focus group. Thematic analysis of the resulting data generated four themes: 'Caution replaced by contentment', 'Distraction and implications for pain and wound care', 'Anxiety, control and enjoyment' and 'Preparation and communication concerns'. Results suggested that user-informed active VR was acceptable to burn patients, helped manage their perceived pain, and was both usable and desirable within the clinical environment. Further testing with larger samples is now required.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Emergency & Critical Care Medicine; 1103 Clinical Sciences
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1093/jbcr/irz106
    Page Range: 878-885
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2019 09:26
    Last Modified: 28 Oct 2019 10:30
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/24774

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