Expanding training capacity for radiographer reporting using simulation: Evaluation of a pilot academy project

HARCUS, James and SNAITH, B. (2019). Expanding training capacity for radiographer reporting using simulation: Evaluation of a pilot academy project. Radiography, 25 (4), 288-293.

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Official URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radi.2019.05.010

Abstract

Introduction Whilst there is increasing demand on radiology services in the UK, pressures are restricting the expansion of the multi-professional workforce. A pilot academy for radiography reporting was established to augment the traditional university and clinical education in a simulated environment using focussed teaching and real image worklists in a dedicated environment away from departments. Methods Located at a facility to replicate the clinical reporting environment, the emphasis of the nine-month pilot was to provide extensive ‘hands-on’ training to eight trainees. Evaluation of the academy was undertaken through focus groups, telephone interviews, and online surveys to consider the experiences of the trainees and their managers and mentors. Results There was overwhelming support for the academy from trainees, mentors, and managers. Key benefits included relieving pressures on department and mentors; providing an intense, structured, and safe environment to learn; and, perhaps most importantly, an extensive and cohesive peer-support network. Issues identified included conflict within departments due to differences in reporting style and the need for greater collaboration between the university, academy, and departments. Conclusion The use of simulation in education is widely researched, however, there are a number of key factors that need to be considered when implementing it into practise. Peer-support and reflection is seen as essential for its success. Extensive dedicated time to focus on reporting alongside peers can support the development of these skills away from the clinical environment and as such can reduce pressure on service delivery and positively influence learner outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** Article version: AM ** Embargo end date: 31-12-9999 ** From Elsevier via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for AM version of this article: This article is under embargo with an end date yet to be finalised. **Journal IDs: issn 10788174 **History: issue date 19-06-2019; accepted 30-05-2019
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radi.2019.05.010
Page Range: 288-293
SWORD Depositor: Louise Beirne
Depositing User: Louise Beirne
Date Deposited: 26 Jun 2019 09:08
Last Modified: 07 Oct 2019 13:30
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/24748

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