Combining self-affirmation with implementation intentions to promote fruit and vegetable consumption

HARRIS, Peter R., BREARLEY, Irina, SHEERAN, Paschal, BARKER, Margo, KLEIN, William M.P., CRESWELL, J. David, LEVINE, John M. and BOND, Rod (2014). Combining self-affirmation with implementation intentions to promote fruit and vegetable consumption. Health Psychology, 33 (7), 729-736.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Brearley-CombiningSelfAffirmation(AM).pdf - Accepted Version
All rights reserved.

Download (414kB) | Preview
Official URL: https://psycnet.apa.org/search/display?id=248d875f...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000065

Abstract

Objective: The current study tested whether self-affirmation in the context of a threatening health message helps promote a health behavior (fruit and vegetable consumption) over a 3-month period, and whether adding a manipulation to support the translation of intentions into behavior (an implementation intentions induction) enhances the impact of self-affirmation. Methods: Participants (N = 332, 71% women) reported their baseline consumption and were randomly assigned to condition in a 2 (self-affirmation: yes, no) × 2 (implementation intentions: formed, not formed) between-subjects factorial design. They completed a self-affirmation/control task and then read a health communication advising eating at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables daily. Next participants reported intentions for behavior change, after which they formed/did not form relevant implementation intentions. Consumption was measured again 7 days and 3 months postintervention. Results: Self-affirmed (vs. nonaffirmed) participants reported eating more fruit and vegetables at both follow-ups. Forming (vs. not forming) implementation intentions was also beneficial for consumption. At 7 days, there was also a significant self-affirmation × implementation intentions interaction: consumption was highest when self-affirmed participants also formed implementation intentions. Conclusions: The present study offers new evidence concerning the impact and durability of self-affirmation on health behaviors and the role of implementation intentions in enhancing the impact of self-affirmation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 11 Medical and Health Sciences; 13 Education; 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences; Public Health
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000065
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 10 Apr 2019 10:32
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2019 11:00
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/24286

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics