The environmental temperature of the residential care home: role in thermal comfort and mental health?

CLEARY, Michelle, RAEBURN, Toby, WEST, Sancia and CHILDS, Charmaine (2019). The environmental temperature of the residential care home: role in thermal comfort and mental health? Contemporary nurse.

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Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10376...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/10376178.2019.1583068

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In the midst of changing environmental conditions and increasing populations aged over 65 years, how best to provide nursing care that promotes mental health and wellbeing within residential aged care facilities is an important concern. AIM/OBJECTIVE: To explore the perceptions of temperature control, thermal comfort and nursing care in a small group of older Australians. DESIGN: Descriptive, qualitative study using thematic analysis. METHODS: Individual semi-structured interviews (March to April 2017) were conducted with a group of older Australians who live within an aged care facility in NSW, Australia. Interviews were taped, transcribed and then analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Five adults (three male and 2 female) participated. Themes emerging included: (1) Reliance on habitual behaviour to cope with temperature; (2) The importance of mobility to cope with temperature; (3) Balancing nursing care and resident autonomy. The importance of experiencing a sense of choice and ability to self-regulate personal environment arose as a substantial concern. CONCLUSIONS: The attention of older residents to personal issues related to thermal comfort linked to physical and mental health emphasise the importance of concerns regarding mobility, nursing care and autonomy. For older age residents the interplay between thermal comfort and behaviour adaptation is influenced by nurses and their control of the residential environment. Impact statement: Nursing staff need to consider aged care residents personal preference in choosing thermal control measures, thereby enhancing autonomy and resident satisfaction.

Item Type: Article
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/10376178.2019.1583068
Depositing User: Hilary Ridgway
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2019 11:16
Last Modified: 13 Mar 2019 12:08
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/24025

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