An observational study of temperature and thermal images of surgical wounds for detecting delayed wound healing within four days after surgery

SIAH, Chiew Jiat, CHILDS, Charmaine, CHIA, Chung King and CHENG, Kin-Fong Karis (2019). An observational study of temperature and thermal images of surgical wounds for detecting delayed wound healing within four days after surgery. Journal of clinical nursing, 28 (11-12), 2285-2295.

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jo...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14832
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    Abstract

    Aim: This study aimed to elucidate the infrared thermal patterns and temperature readings of the surfaces of surgical wounds for detecting delayed wound healing within four days after surgery. Background: The nursing assessment of surgical wounds within the first four days after surgery is commonly based on visual and physical examination. Surgical wounds with delayed healing may be not detected if they do not exhibit signs such as redness or exudate within four days after surgery. Design: This study was conducted using prospective observational design with reference to the STROBE Statement to examine the temperatures of surgical wounds in their natural settings. Methods: Based on convenience sampling, 60 participants admitted to the colorectal surgical ward for enterostoma closure from January to November 2013 were recruited. Results: Although both infected and non-infected surgical wounds exhibited a significant increase in wound temperature from Days 1 to 4, the infected wounds revealed a statistically significantly lower temperature than the non-infected ones. Within the infrared thermal images, the infected wounds presented with partial warming of the skin surrounding and along the incision, suggesting that delayed healing could be identified. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that delayed wound healing can be detected within the first four days after surgery for early intervention of prevention and treatment before discharge.

    Item Type: Article
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14832
    Page Range: 2285-2295
    Depositing User: Hilary Ridgway
    Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2019 11:21
    Last Modified: 21 Feb 2020 01:18
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/23787

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