Big brother’s little sister: the ideological construction of women’s super league

WOODHOUSE, Donna, FIELDING-LLOYD, Beth and SEQUERRA, Ruth (2019). Big brother’s little sister: the ideological construction of women’s super league. Sport in Society.

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Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17430...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/17430437.2018.1548612

Abstract

This article explores the structure and culture of the Football Association (FA) in relation to the development of England’s first semiprofessional female soccer league—Women’s Super League (WSL). Through observations and interviews, we examined the planning and operationalization of WSL. Drawing on critical feminist literature and theories of organizational change, we demonstrate the FA’s shift from tolerance of the women’s game, through opposition, to defining and controlling elite female club football as a new product shaped by traditional conceptualizations of gender. The labyrinthine structures of the FA abetted the exclusion of pre-WSL stakeholders, allowing the FA to fashion a League imagined as both qualitatively different to elite men’s football in terms of style of play, appealing to a different fan base, yet inextricably bound to men’s clubs for support. It concludes by providing recommendations for how organizational change might offer correctives to the FA approach to developing WSL.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science; 1504 Commercial Services; 1608 Sociology; Sport, Leisure & Tourism
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/17430437.2018.1548612
SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2019 15:07
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2019 16:29
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/23756

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