Assessment of Migration of Human MSCs through Fibrin Hydrogels as a Tool for Formulation Optimisation

SALAM, Nasseem, TOUMPANIARI, Sotiria, GENTILE, Piergiorgio, MARINA FERREIRA, Ana, DALGARNO, Kenneth and PARTRIDGE, Simon (2018). Assessment of Migration of Human MSCs through Fibrin Hydrogels as a Tool for Formulation Optimisation. Materials, 11 (9), p. 1781.

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Official URL: https://www.mdpi.com/1996-1944/11/9/1781
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11091781
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    Abstract

    Control of cell migration is fundamental to the performance of materials for cell delivery, as for cells to provide any therapeutic effect, they must migrate out from the delivery material. Here the influence of fibrinogen concentration on the migration of encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) from a cell spheroid through fibrin hydrogels is tracked over time. Fibrin was chosen as a model material as it is routinely employed as a haemostatic agent and more recently has been applied as a localised delivery vehicle for potential therapeutic cell populations. The hydrogels consisted of 5 U/mL thrombin and between 5 and 50 mg/mL fibrinogen. Microstructural and viscoelastic properties of different compositions were evaluated using SEM and rheometry. Increasing the fibrinogen concentration resulted in a visibly denser matrix with smaller pores and higher stiffness. hMSCs dispersed within the fibrin gels maintained cell viability post-encapsulation, however, the migration of cells from an encapsulated spheroid revealed that denser fibrin matrices inhibit cell migration. This study provides the first quantitative study on the influence of fibrinogen concentration on 3D hMSC migration within fibrin gels, which can be used to guide material selection for scaffold design in tissue engineering and for the clinical application of fibrin sealants.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: This article belongs to the Special Issue Scaffold Materials for Tissue Engineering
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Materials and Engineering Research Institute > Structural Materials and Integrity Research Centre > Centre for Infrastructure Management
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11091781
    Page Range: p. 1781
    Depositing User: Carmel House
    Date Deposited: 10 Oct 2018 12:39
    Last Modified: 19 Jun 2020 13:08
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/22830

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