Is society smart enough to deal with smart cards?

REID, Alan (2007). Is society smart enough to deal with smart cards? Computer Law & Security Review, 23 (1), 53-61.

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Official URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clsr.2006.11.006

Abstract

This article discusses the legal issues surrounding the development of RFID enabled smart cards. Smart cards can transform the delivery of services and goods, through the automated identification and verification of customers, resulting in significant efficiency gains and ultimately lower costs for consumers. Smart cards have the potential to seriously undermine the human right to privacy. They may greatly facilitate the surreptitious collection of personal data. The privacy of consumers may be violated which will seriously undermine user confidence in the trustworthiness of commercial organisations and state institutions alike. Solutions to the privacy problem must be holistic, and encompass responses from a range of stakeholders. Where possible, the design of the smart card technology must be privacy promoting. In cases where this is not possible, deployment of smart card technology must be accompanied by the effective enforcement of privacy legislation, voluntary self and co-regulation, codes of conduct and technological tools.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Also posted on the papers section of the website of the French Presidency of the EU conference, Internet of Things/Internet of the Future: Building Tomorrow’s Internet Together, 6-7th October, Nice, 2008
Departments: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Department of Law and Criminology
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clsr.2006.11.006
Depositing User: Louise Beirne
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2018 11:04
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2018 11:04
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/22686

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