A mixed-methods investigation into the acceptability, usability and perceived effectiveness of active and passive virtual reality scenarios in managing pain under experimental conditions

PHELAN, Ivan, FURNESS, Penny, FEHILY, Orla, THOMPSON, Andrew, BABIKER, Nathan, LAMB, Martin and LINDLEY, Shirley (2019). A mixed-methods investigation into the acceptability, usability and perceived effectiveness of active and passive virtual reality scenarios in managing pain under experimental conditions. Journal of Burn Care & Research, 40 (1), 85-90.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1093/jbcr/iry052

Abstract

Burns patients often suffer excruciating pain during clinical procedures, even with analgesia. Virtual Reality as an adjunct to pharmacological therapy has proved promising in the management of burn pain. More evidence is needed regarding specific forms of Virtual Reality. This mixed-method study examined the impact of active and passive Virtual Reality scenarios in experimental conditions, gathering data relating to user experience, acceptability and effectiveness in managing pain. Four scenarios were developed or selected following a consultative workshop with burns survivors and clinicians. Each was trialled using a cold pressor test with 15 University students. Data were gathered regarding pain threshold and tolerance at baseline and during each exposure. Short interviews were conducted afterwards. The two active scenarios were ranked highest and significantly extended participants pain threshold and tolerance times compared to passive and baseline conditions. Passive scenarios offered little distraction and relief from pain. Active scenarios were perceived to be engaging, challenging, distracting and immersive. They reduced subjective awareness of pain, though suggestions were made for further improvements. Results suggested that active Virtual Reality was acceptable and enjoyable as a means of helping to control experimental pain. Following suggested improvements, scenarios should now be tested in the clinical environment.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Cultural Communication and Computing Research Institute > Communication and Computing Research Centre
Departments - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Department of Psychology, Sociology and Politics
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1093/jbcr/iry052
Depositing User: Penny Furness
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2018 15:28
Last Modified: 02 Jan 2019 11:45
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/22594

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