Weight ‘locus of control’ and weight management in an urban population

SIMPER, Trevor and KEEBLE, Matthew (2018). Weight ‘locus of control’ and weight management in an urban population. Journal of Behavioral Health, 7 (3), 103-112.

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Official URL: http://www.jbehavioralhealth.com/?mno=298345
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.5455/jbh.20180503065803
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    Abstract

    Background: To assess the extent to which Weight Locus of control relates to BMI and socio-economic status in an urban population. Methods: 232 people responded to a questionnaire relating to bodyweight, health, weight management and the ‘weight locus of control’. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 2600 people in Sheffield, United Kingdom. The questionnaires were distributed into diverse 'ward' areas; data was collected in 2016. Results: In the present investigation BMI correlated with ward area (P<0.001) (BMI was 27.5kg/m² ± 6.8 in ward area 1 versus 23.6kg/m² ± 4.1 in ward area 4). The higher an individual's BMI the more 'external' they were in relation to their perception of factors affecting weight control (P=0.024). Higher status occupation was correlated with a greater likelihood of having an internal weight locus of control (P=0.004). Having a high BMI was correlated with concern over health (P=0.041). Conclusions: People of higher weight and lower occupational status have more external loci of control. Key theoretical and clinical approaches to behaviour change (e.g. Self-Determination Theory and Motivational Interviewing) suggest that 'internality' is a desirable locus of control orientation. Consideration of the findings from the present investigation conclude that for weight management practice, professionals could focus on developing 'internality'.

    Item Type: Article
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Centre for Food Innovation
    Departments - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Sheffield Business School > Department of Service Sector Management
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.5455/jbh.20180503065803
    Page Range: 103-112
    Depositing User: Trevor Simper
    Date Deposited: 12 Sep 2018 14:21
    Last Modified: 20 Dec 2018 11:45
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/22430

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