Understanding an alternative approach to paramedic leadership

JOHNSON, David, BAINBRIDGE, Peter and HAZARD, Wendy (2018). Understanding an alternative approach to paramedic leadership. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 10 (8), 1-6.

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Official URL: https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/jpar...

Abstract

Leadership is an essential feature of the life of a paramedic. During incidents, while working with multi-agency colleagues, and within organisations, leadership is an expected quality for paramedics to have. Across health and social care organisations, leadership is said to be of pivotal importance to future success. This has led to a large investment in leadership development programmes that organisations are now seeking to justify. Leadership, as a concept however, is complex and multifaceted. The nature of leadership has been debated over millennia and disagreement remains as to how to define it. The current article uses Critical Interpretive Synthesis to consider how approaches to leadership have developed over time. It concludes with a synthesising argument that leadership is a social construct; as such, no single definition will ever be appropriate. However, the four elements that comprise the leadership equation should be considered if the paramedic leader is to be effective.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** From Crossref via Jisc Publications Router. **Journal IDs: pissn 1759-1376; eissn 2041-9457
Departments: Health and Well-being > Department of Allied Health Professions
Health and Well-being > Department of Social Work, Social Care and Community Studies
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.12968/jpar.2018.10.8.cpd2
SWORD Depositor: Margaret Boot
Depositing User: Margaret Boot
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2018 09:21
Last Modified: 03 Feb 2019 01:18
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/22287

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