Participation with online recovery specific groups - findings from the UK Life in Recovery survey 2015

GRAHAM, Simon, IRVING, Jamie, CANO, Ivan and EDWARDS, Michael (2018). Participation with online recovery specific groups - findings from the UK Life in Recovery survey 2015. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly.

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Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07347...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/07347324.2018.1500873

Abstract

As the concept of recovery has expanded, and become embedded in drug and alcohol policy, so too has the proliferation of online recovery support. This article explores data from the UK Life in Recovery survey, focusing on online recovery methods categorized as online groups, websites, and smartphone applications. Although 301 people (39.30%) reported involvement with at least one online recovery method, chi-squared tests reveal significant associations between people in stable recovery (5 years or more) and the use of recovery applications (Cramer’s V = .114), as well as between people in full-time employment and the use of online recovery websites or recovery applications. Having dependent children was not associated with use of any online recovery method, yet gender was (Cramer’s V = .088). This study extends the relatively limited literature and knowledge base of online recovery methods. Although the evidence points to higher engagement of recovery websites and apps for people in stable recovery, encouraging online recovery methods for individuals in early recovery may support recovery efforts when the risk of returning to substance misuse and active using social networks remains high. Further research should investigate the mechanisms of recovery change, with a focus on gender differences.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** From Crossref via Jisc Publications Router. **Journal IDs: pissn 0734-7324; eissn 1544-4538
Uncontrolled Keywords: Medicine (miscellaneous), Psychiatry and Mental health
Departments - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Department of Law and Criminology
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/07347324.2018.1500873
SWORD Depositor: Margaret Boot
Depositing User: Margaret Boot
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2018 10:39
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2018 13:24
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/22268

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