Multiple pathways to recovery, multiple roads to well-being: an analysis of recovery pathways in the Australian Life in Recovery survey

ELMS, Elizabeth, SAVIC, Michael, BATHISH, Ramez, BEST, David, MANNING, Victoria and LUBMAN, Dan I. (2018). Multiple pathways to recovery, multiple roads to well-being: an analysis of recovery pathways in the Australian Life in Recovery survey. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly.

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Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07347...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/07347324.2018.1490158

Abstract

It is generally acknowledged that there are multiple pathways to recovery from alcohol and other drug (AOD) problems. These may include participation in AOD treatment, mutual aid, or other activities. It is unclear whether particular sociodemographic characteristics shape a person’s recovery journey or whether particular recovery pathways are associated with improved well-being. This article explores these questions using data from the Australian Life in Recovery study (N = 573). Compared to treatment and/or mutual aid pathway groups, the natural recovery group were less likely to have used mental health services and were more socially connected during periods of addiction. Since being in recovery, mutual aid pathway groups more strongly identified as being in recovery and having social networks consisting of a greater proportion of people in recovery compared to the natural recovery group. People in all pathway groups reported high well-being, and there were no significant differences in well-being measures between groups. Findings suggest that people in recovery may experience high well-being irrespective of the pathway they take, but social factors may be influential in which pathways people take. Treatment and recovery systems need to offer multiple recovery pathways so that people can take the pathway that suits them best.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** From Crossref via Jisc Publications Router.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Medicine (miscellaneous), Psychiatry and Mental health
Departments: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Department of Law and Criminology
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/07347324.2018.1490158
SWORD Depositor: Margaret Boot
Depositing User: Margaret Boot
Date Deposited: 26 Jul 2018 08:23
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2018 14:09
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/22071

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