Affective economies, autism, and ‘challenging behaviour’: socio-spatial emotions in disabled children’s education

PLUQUAILEC, Jill (2018). Affective economies, autism, and ‘challenging behaviour’: socio-spatial emotions in disabled children’s education. Emotion, Space and Society.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.emospa.2018.07.004

Abstract

This paper tells a story of a small action in a fleeting moment in a morning spent in a UK special school classroom with Molly, a child with an autism diagnosis. It brings the socio-politically active sphere of Critical Disability Studies (Goodley, 2014; Goodley and Runswick-Cole, 2014; Titchkosky and Michalko, 2012; Shildrick, 2012; Titchkosky 2011) and more recently, the emergent Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies (Runswick-Cole, Curran and Liddiard, 2017; Curran and Runswick-Cole, 2013) in to conversation with emotional geographies in education (Kenway and Youdell, 2011). This paper rejects the pathologising of disabled children’s emotions as symptoms of disorder and instead reorientates our gaze towards emotions as socio-spatially mediated in the subjectification of children in school spaces. It does this by drawing together the theoretical tools of Ahmed’s affective economies (2004a; 2004b) to explore the interventions in the everyday lives of disabled school children. Ahmed’s affective economies are put to work to explore the emotions produced, reproduced and resisted between bodies in disabled children’s schooling. Through such a reorientation we can explore how the subjectivation of children labelled with Special Educational Needs or Disability (SEND) becomes between bodies rather than residing within an individual child’s pathology or psychology.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: disability; emotions; childhood; autism; education; storytelling
Departments - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.emospa.2018.07.004
Depositing User: Jill Pluquailec
Date Deposited: 19 Jul 2018 08:35
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2018 14:09
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/22025

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