The evaluation of a self-learn scheme in applied science for students of hotel, catering and institutional management and home economics, and the identification of factors which may be associated with aspects of student performance.

HORSEY, J. (1977). The evaluation of a self-learn scheme in applied science for students of hotel, catering and institutional management and home economics, and the identification of factors which may be associated with aspects of student performance. Doctoral, Sheffield Hallam University (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

In introducing a new form of a course there is a need to evaluate its relevance towards students, to monitor the course in order to effect any necessary modifications, and to establish the nature of the relationship between performance and teaching method. This Self-Learn Scheme in Applied Science was designed by A. Milson of the Department of Hotel and Catering Studies and Home Economics of Sheffield City Polytechnic (formerly Sheffield Polytechnic). It was first implemented in the academic year 1973/74 and was significantly modified at the end of the summar term 1974. A system of computer-marked multiple-choice weekly tests was introduced for use in the 1974/75 academic year. This particular study was started in the 1974/75 academic year. In that year student response to each unit was sought by use of weekly questionnaires. The effects of the unit modifications made in 1974 were assessed by comparison of the student response survey of 1974/75 and a previous survey carried out by Milson in 1973/74, and further modifications to the text of the units were made. Response to the course was also sought by means of semistructured interviews with a random sample of students in the Department, and the administration of the course and methods of feedback to the students were altered as a result of this information. The multiple-choice questions used in the 1974/75 course were evaluated by examining the computer analysis of themarked tests, and were revised. These revised questions were used as the basis for the generation of a computer-bank of questions from which items could be randomly selected to form unit tests.A student's performance on the self-learn course was assessed:1) by marks gained on weekly unit tests and2) by gains in knowledge calculated as the difference betweenscores obtained on a pre-test and on a post-test.Student performance on the self-learn scheme variedconsiderably and various factors suggested in the literature to be related to the level of performance on self-learn schemes were examined with a view to establishing which factors were and which were not related to performance on the self-learn scheme in Applied Science. The data for the examination of these factors was obtained from unit test results, student response questionnaires, survey questionnaires, psychological tests and semi-structured interviews with a random sample of the students.The results so far obtained give some indication of the factors which appear to relate to performance on the self-learn scheme. Academic and non-academic correlates of performance were examined. There was no significant relationship established between 'O' and 'A' level performance and performance on the self-learn scheme. Prior level of science knowledge was found to be related to performance on this self-learn course, but the relationship was not such that performance on the course could be predicted by knowledge of science background alone. Of thenon-academic factors investigated, measurable personality traits were not found to be related to any coherent, consistent way with performance on the self-learn scheme, and it is possible that the practical value of knowledge of the "personality" of the student (as defined by the tests in use at the present time), is very limited. Study habits and the level of motivation of the student seem to be of greatest significance in determining performance. It seems possible therefore that attention to these two factors could yield an improvement in student performance on the self-learn scheme.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Additional Information: Thesis (M.Phil.)--Sheffield Hallam University (United Kingdom), 1977.
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Sheffield Hallam Doctoral Theses
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Deposited: 10 Apr 2018 17:20
Last Modified: 10 Apr 2018 17:20
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/19831

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