‘Speak at this’: An approach to the completion of speech acts during interactive Shakespeare performances in schools

BELL, Henry (2018). ‘Speak at this’: An approach to the completion of speech acts during interactive Shakespeare performances in schools. Theatre, Dance and Performance Training, 9 (2), 158-173.

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Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/194439...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/19443927.2018.1462250
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Abstract

It is 2014 in a secondary school in Scarborough, North Yorkshire. A performance of Romeo and Juliet is taking place in the school hall. An audience of teenagers are sitting on plastic blue chairs arranged in-the-round. During the ‘balcony scene’ the performer playing Romeo asks a member of the audience, ‘Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?’, this audience member urges him to ‘hear more’. This article interrogates this moment in performance, the process that was required to achieve it and the validity of it as a successfully completed Speech Act. Speech Act Theory has been used as a valuable method for Shakespearean textual analysis but this article investigates the merits of its application as a rehearsal technique: What training methods augment the performative nature of audience address? How can current theoretical concerns in audience studies temper the application of Speech Act Theory in this context to provide an open and interactive Shakespeare performance atmosphere for young people? In order to address these questions, the argument will draw upon media and data from a large scale PaR project based produced by Hull University and the Stephen Joseph Theatre in Yorkshire in 2014.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Shakespeare. Speech Act . Romeo and Juliet. Actor Training. Shakespeare in Schools .
Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Humanities Research Centre
Departments - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Department of Humanities
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/19443927.2018.1462250
Page Range: 158-173
Depositing User: Henry Bell
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2018 10:58
Last Modified: 28 Dec 2019 01:18
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/19104

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