Teaching Advocacy with History and in Context.

WATSON, Andrew (2014). Teaching Advocacy with History and in Context. In: International Advocacy Teaching Conference 2014, Nottingham, 9th June, 2014. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

It has been said that students faced with greater expenses than before of attending university are choosing, with an eye to their future, to study law courses which have a vocational element. At universities there has been a growth of courses which introduce students to advocacy in simulated court cases, and in clinical legal education, often involving, representing real clients before various tribunals under supervision . Students are taught practical skills of advocacy. These courses are generally well received by students, often provide them with confidence and may well lead some to qualify as lawyers . It is submitted that students’ appreciation and knowledge of courtroom advocacy could be further enhanced by adding study about what has shaped it and what is doing so now: The writer, having comparatively recently completed a PhD on the subject , is convinced that the story of advocacy deserves being told wider. A proposal to include history and context in courses with much vocational content requires elabouration and to be justified - the purpose of this paper.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Law and Criminology Research Group
Departments: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Law and Criminology
Depositing User: Andrew Watson
Date Deposited: 10 Jan 2018 14:42
Last Modified: 28 Jan 2018 06:15
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/17796

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