Compassion in Practice - a mixed methods study of awareness, involvement and perceived impact of a national nursing and midwifery strategy amongst health care professionals in NHS Trusts in the United Kingdom

O'DRISCOLL, M, ALLAN, HAT, CORBETT, K and SERRANT, Laura (2017). Compassion in Practice - a mixed methods study of awareness, involvement and perceived impact of a national nursing and midwifery strategy amongst health care professionals in NHS Trusts in the United Kingdom. Journal Of Clinical Nursing. (In Press)

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Link to published version:: 10.1111/jocn.14176

Abstract

Aim To report the findings from an evaluation of the impact of the Compassion in Practice Vision & Strategy (CiPVS) (National Health Service England (NHSE), 2012) on nursing, midwifery and care staff. Background The CiPVS was a programme of work to highlight the importance of compassionate care following the Francis Report in 2013 into the deficits in care in an NHS hospital trust. It was launched by NHS England in 2012 at a time when fiscal cuts were introduced by the Department of Health in England. Design and setting Mixed methods. Results Inferential statistics were used to test whether there were significant differences between staff at different levels of seniority with regard to awareness and involvement in CiPVS and their attitudes to it. Awareness and involvement of staff in CiPVS was high amongst middle and senior management but limited at ward level. Staff were not involved in CiPVS due to a lack of awareness. Ward level staff who were aware and involved perceived a lack of support and communication from senior leadership to deliver CiPVS. Discussion Results reveal professional anger, distress and resistance to CiPVS and a view of the programme as a top down initiative which did not sufficiently recognise structural constraints on nurses’ ability to deliver compassionate care. We discuss the implications of our findings for global nursing. Conclusion Participants emphasised that compassion for patients is only sustainable where there is compassion for staff and many participants felt that they were not being treated with compassion. Relevance for practice NHSE should strongly affirm that nurses and midwives in general provide compassionate care. Trust leadership should provide support for ward level staff who deliver compassionate care in difficult circumstances.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Health and Social Care Research
Identification Number: 10.1111/jocn.14176
Depositing User: Laura Serrant
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2017 16:57
Last Modified: 24 Nov 2017 00:38
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/17330

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