Tourists’ Responses to Government Intentions for Red Tourism In China

WAN, Xiang (2017). Tourists’ Responses to Government Intentions for Red Tourism In China. Doctoral, Sheffield Hallam University.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.7190/shu-thesis-00040

Abstract

This study analyses the Chinese government’s involvement in Red Tourism, with a special focus on the government’s political intentions in conveying messages at Red Tourism sites, and, critically, how tourists respond to the messages presented there. There are two separate identifiable phases in the development of Red Tourism since 2004. The first phase is from 2004 to 2010 and the second one is from 2011 to 2015. Shaoshan, the birthplace of Mao Zedong, and Zhijiang, which is dedicated to commemorating the surrender of the Japanese Imperial Army, are selected to examine the government’s political intentions behind the messages presented at these two Red Tourism sites. The former is the best example from the first phase, while the latter is one of the most important in the second phase. The messages produced by the Chinese government are communicated to tourists in Red Tourism sites, encouraging tourists to embrace certain political ideals. However, the messages presented at Red Tourism sites do not necessarily lead to tourists accepting unreservedly the government point of view. Tourists are free to reject this discourse and construct their own reading of the sites, and this they frequently do. Therefore, the sender of the messages, the government, and the receiver of the messages, the tourists, may not be in agreement. It is to be hoped that this study contributes to a better understanding of Red Tourism in contemporary China, while the responses of visitors may will provide valuable insights into the state of Chinese society today.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Additional Information: Director of Studies: Bill Bramwell and Dr. Nicola Palmer
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Sheffield Hallam Doctoral Theses
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.7190/shu-thesis-00040
Depositing User: Hilary Ridgway
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2017 15:51
Last Modified: 18 Apr 2018 14:43
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/17301

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