An evaluation of the BrainLAB 6D ExacTrac/Novalis Tx System for image-guided intracranial radiotherapy

MONTGOMERY, Claire and COLLINS, Mark (2017). An evaluation of the BrainLAB 6D ExacTrac/Novalis Tx System for image-guided intracranial radiotherapy. Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice, 16 (3), 326-333.

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Official URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of...
Link to published version:: 10.1017/S1460396917000139

Abstract

Purpose Stereotactic-fractionated radiotherapy and radiosurgery (RS) for benign and malignant intracranial lesions relies on a very high degree of accuracy in dose alignment due to the ablative dose delivered, and therefore requires a high-precision image guidance modality. The aim of this review is to investigate the localisation and verification accuracy performance of ExacTrac (ET) and Novalis Tx System. Materials and methods A systematic review of the database Science Direct was carried out using search terms 'stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT)' and 'ET'. All articles before 2000 were excluded. Only articles that involved intracranial lesions, with the exception of one article, were included in the final review. Results Results from gold standard Hidden Target Tests and patient data show that patient position can be reproduced within 1 0 mm with the use of ET imaging. In addition, the 6 degrees of freedom algorithm function of ET allows for better translational accuracy as well optimal positioning when rotations are corrected for. Studies showed excellent correlation (p<0 01) between bony ET images and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) soft tissue registration, evidencing the safe reliance of bony anatomy for image guidance via ET. Shifts were found to be comparable between CBCT and ET. Conclusion There is the need for regular calibration to prevent systematic errors and potential geographic miss. However, due to ET's additional benefits, including reduced concomitant dose and faster imaging time, ET is the superior image guidance modality for RS/SRT in the treatment of intracranial lesions

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Health and Social Care Research
Identification Number: 10.1017/S1460396917000139
Depositing User: Carmel House
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2017 14:58
Last Modified: 11 Oct 2017 14:58
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/17002

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