Austerity policing, emotional labour and the boundaries of police work: an ethnography of a police force control room in England

LUMSDEN, Karen and BLACK, Alexandra (2018). Austerity policing, emotional labour and the boundaries of police work: an ethnography of a police force control room in England. The British Journal of Criminology, 58 (3), 606-623.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azx045
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    Abstract

    This article discusses the changing role of policing in an era of austerity from the perspective of frontline civilian police staff (call handlers and dispatchers) in a force control room (FCR). It draws on a symbolic interactionist framework and the concept of emotional labour (Hochschild 1979; 1983[2012]) in order to explore the emotional responses and strategies engaged in by staff when responding to 101 non-emergency calls and 999 emergency calls. The clash of public and police expectations, and the emotional labour expended when managing this clash, provide a valuable insight into the frontline staff perspective on the changing role of the police under austerity. Data is drawn from ethnographic fieldwork in the control room of a police force in England.

    Item Type: Article
    Departments - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Department of Law and Criminology
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azx045
    Page Range: 606-623
    Depositing User: Alexandra Black
    Date Deposited: 11 Aug 2017 15:31
    Last Modified: 18 Mar 2021 03:40
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/16497

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