Prevalence of laceration injuries in professional and amateur rugby union: a systematic review and meta-analysis

OUDSHOORN, Bodil, DRISCOLL, Heather, KILNER, Karen, DUNN, Marcus and JAMES, David (2017). Prevalence of laceration injuries in professional and amateur rugby union: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, 3 (1), e000239.

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Official URL: http://bmjopensem.bmj.com/content/3/1/e000239
Link to published version:: 10.1136/bmjsem-2017-000239

Abstract

Background: Studded footwear can cause severe lacerations in rugby union; the prevalence of these injuries is currently unknown. Objective: To summarise the skin and laceration injury prevalence in published epidemiological studies and to investigate any differences in skin injury risk between amateur and professional players. Design: Systematic literature review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies. Data sources: Pubmed, Web of Science, Scopus and Ovid. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies: Prospective, epidemiological studies published in English after 1995, measuring a minimum of 400 match or 900 training exposure hours. Participants should be adult rugby union players (amateur or professional). The study should report a separate skin or laceration injury category and provide sufficient detail to calculate injury prevalence within this category. Results: Twelve studies were included. Mean skin injury prevalence during matches was 2.4 injuries per 1000 exposure hours; during training sessions the prevalence was 0.06 injuries per 1000 exposure hours. Skin injuries accounted for 5.3% of match injuries and 1.7% of training injuries. Skin injury risk was similar for amateur compared to professional players during matches (odds ratio: 0.63, p = 0.46.), but higher during training sessions (odds ratio: 9.24, p = 0.02). Summary/conclusions: The skin injury prevalence of 2.4 injuries per 1000 exposure hours is equivalent to one time-loss injury sustained during matches per team, per season. Amateur players are more likely to sustain skin injuries during training sessions than professional players. There is a need for more studies observing injuries among amateur players.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Review, Injury, epidemiology, Dermatology, Rugby
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Health and Social Care Research
Centre for Sports Engineering Research
Identification Number: 10.1136/bmjsem-2017-000239
Depositing User: Jill Hazard
Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2017 08:27
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2017 19:23
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/16093

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