Community recovery as a public health intervention: The contagion of hope

BEST, David and DE ALWIS, Stephanie (2017). Community recovery as a public health intervention: The contagion of hope. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 35 (3), 187-199.

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Official URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/073473...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/07347324.2017.1318647
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    Abstract

    There is a growing evidence base for recovery as a journey that involves reduced relapse risk, improved citizenship, and better global health and well-being. Although this is the case, there is a risk of omitting one of the prime benefits of a diverse range of recovery activities—the impact on families and the wider community. What the current article does is to summarize evidence around the “social contagion” of recovery through communities and its potential role in transmitting hope and the belief that recovery is possible even to those who are not yet ready to commit to abstinence. And further, that in doing so, visible recovery increases community cohesion and challenges stigmatisation and exclusion of recovery populations. The implications for public health from an emerging visible and high-profile social identity of recovery is discussed.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Medicine (miscellaneous), Psychiatry and Mental health
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Law and Criminology Research Group
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/07347324.2017.1318647
    Page Range: 187-199
    Depositing User: Carmel House
    Date Deposited: 08 Jun 2017 13:06
    Last Modified: 23 Jun 2020 16:46
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15819

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