Implementation of ultrasound bladder volume scanning for patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the cervix or endometrium: clinical experiences from a United Kingdom radiotherapy department

CLAXTO, K. and APPLEYARD, R. (2017). Implementation of ultrasound bladder volume scanning for patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the cervix or endometrium: clinical experiences from a United Kingdom radiotherapy department. Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice, 1-13. (In Press)

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Official URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of...
Link to published version:: 10.1017/S1460396917000231

Abstract

Background and purpose: Achieving daily consistent bladder volume is acknowledged as challenging for patients undergoing radiotherapy to the cervix or endometrium. We investigated if use of an ultrasound bladder volume scanner (BioCon-700) improves bladder reproducibility when used during an active volume correction protocol. Materials and methods: During our method-comparison study, prospectively recruited patients (n=20) followed a fluid-loading protocol to achieve acceptable bladder volume. Bladder ultrasound was performed daily to verify planned volume, with patients actively correcting volumes outside a planned range up to a maximum of three times. Using the Bland–Altman method, we compared mean ultrasound readings (USMean) with mean cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) volumes (CBCTMean). We also conducted staff focus groups exploring issues encountered during implementation of bladder scanning. Results: Comparing USMean with CBCTMean produced a mean of the differences −10±49·92 mL (1 SD), demonstrating that bladder volume scanning is equivalent to our standard measure for the stated confidence levels. The cohort mean bladder volume decrease from week 1 to 5 was only 8·4%. Mean USMean was 323 mL, mean CBCTMean was 313 mL. Staff experience with the scanner overall was positive. Conclusions: The BioCon-700 is suitable for the purpose of daily pre-treatment volume verification, facilitating daily assessment and modification of bladder volume, resulting in reproducible treatment volumes.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Health and Social Care Research
Identification Number: 10.1017/S1460396917000231
Depositing User: Carmel House
Date Deposited: 26 May 2017 13:31
Last Modified: 26 May 2017 13:31
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15763

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