Dietary habits and supplementation practices of young women during pregnancy: an online cross-sectional survey of young mothers and health care professionals

SOLTANI, Hora, DUXBURY, Alexandra, RUNDLE, Rachel and MARVIN-DOWLE, Katie (2017). Dietary habits and supplementation practices of young women during pregnancy: an online cross-sectional survey of young mothers and health care professionals. BMC Nutrition, 3 (1), 1-15.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40795-017-0137-3
Link to published version:: 10.1186/s40795-017-0137-3

Abstract

Background: Nutrition is a modifiable factor affecting birth outcomes, particularly in adolescent pregnancies. This study explores diet and supplementation practices, information and advice before, during and after pregnancy from the perspectives of pregnant or new young mothers and healthcare professionals. Methods: Two cross-sectional surveys used online questionnaires for young women who were currently pregnant or who had recently given birth, and health care professionals providing antenatal care. The surveys utilised a combination of question types including free text and multiple choice. Recruitment was conducted via the Tommy's website, online forums for young mothers and professional networks. Results: A total of 205 young women and 146 health care professionals were included in the study. Most young women reported taking supplements at some stage of pregnancy (93.2%), with 54.6% taking it on a daily basis. Those who reported taking supplements less than 7 days a week stated it was mainly due to forgetting. Health care professionals however reported that some young women had difficulties accessing healthy start supplements. Young women reported positive dietary changes; however a significant proportion of participants indicated that they avoided some foods unnecessarily. Avoiding or reducing foods such as red meat (22.7%), eggs (40.6%), oily fish (60.4%) and soft cheese (36.2%) is of concern. Midwife/family nurse (38.0%) was young women's current favourite information source; smartphone applications (apps) and recipe booklets were suggested by over 50% of participants as a new addition to existing services. Health care professionals reported they included nutritional information and support as part of their role; however they felt there were some gaps in knowledge and confidence. Midwives in particular suggested a lack of sufficient time and resources as a main challenge in providing adequate support.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Health and Social Care Research
Identification Number: 10.1186/s40795-017-0137-3
Depositing User: Helen Garner
Date Deposited: 10 May 2017 13:33
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2017 20:32
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15715

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