Political conflict, policing and the challenges of masculinity: The experiences of women officers in the Royal Ulster Constabulary GC

SOUTHERN, Neil (2018). Political conflict, policing and the challenges of masculinity: The experiences of women officers in the Royal Ulster Constabulary GC. Police Journal: Theory, Practice and Principles, 91 (1), 44-63.

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Official URL: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0032258X16...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1177/0032258X16687165
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    Abstract

    Policing is regarded as a masculine occupation. Traditionally women officers performed gendered duties, mostly working with women and children whilst men did ‘real’ police work. Policewomen’s roles have broadened considerably, despite being met with patterns of male officer resistance. This article explores the experiences of women officers who served in the Royal Ulster Constabulary GC during the Northern Ireland conflict. It examines three themes: first, women officers’ views on the suitability of females for police work; second, the idea that women officers possess attributes particularly well suited to certain policing roles; finally, officers’ experiences of working in a masculine environment.

    Item Type: Article
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Cultural Communication and Computing Research Institute > Art and Design Research Centre
    Departments - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Department of Psychology, Sociology and Politics
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1177/0032258X16687165
    Page Range: 44-63
    Depositing User: Neil Southern
    Date Deposited: 08 May 2017 13:15
    Last Modified: 26 Mar 2018 12:16
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15627

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