Sources of phoneme errors in repetition: perseverative, neologistic and lesion patterns in jargon aphasia

PILKINGTON, Emma, KEIDEL, James, KENDRICK, Luke, SADDY, Doug, SAGE, Karen and ROBSON, Holly (2017). Sources of phoneme errors in repetition: perseverative, neologistic and lesion patterns in jargon aphasia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11, p. 225.

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Official URL: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnh...
Link to published version:: 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00225

Abstract

This study examined patterns of neologistic and perseverative errors during word repetition in fluent Jargon aphasia. The principal hypotheses accounting for Jargon production indicate that poor activation of a target stimulus leads to weakly activated target phoneme segments, which are outcompeted at the phonological encoding level. Voxel-lesion symptom mapping studies of word repetition errors suggest a breakdown in the translation from auditory-phonological analysis to motor activation. Behavioural analyses of repetition data were used to analyse the target relatedness (Phonological Overlap Index: POI) of neologistic errors and patterns of perseveration in 25 individuals with Jargon aphasia. Lesion-symptom analyses explored the relationship between neurological damage and jargon repetition in a group of 38 aphasia participants. Behavioural results showed that neologisms produced by 23 jargon individuals contained greater degrees of target lexico-phonological information than predicted by chance and that neologistic and perseverative production were closely associated. A significant relationship between jargon production and lesions to temporoparietal regions was identified. Region of interest regression analyses suggested that damage the posterior superior temporal gyrus and superior temporal sulcus in combination was best predictive of a Jargon aphasia profile. Taken together these results suggest that poor phonological encoding secondary to impairment in sensory-motor integration alongside impairments in self-monitoring result in jargon repetition. Insights for clinical management and future directions are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is part of the research topic : "Impact of Verbal Repetition and Imitation on Functional and Structural Networks Underpinning Language Learning and Rehabilitation"
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Health and Social Care Research
Departments: Health and Well-being > Allied Health Professions
Identification Number: 10.3389/fnhum.2017.00225
Depositing User: Karen Sage
Date Deposited: 24 Apr 2017 13:11
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2017 20:28
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15564

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