'“To fashion grounds, from whence artes might be coyn’d”: Commerce and the Postlapsarian State in Greville’s Poetry'

CADMAN, Daniel (2017). '“To fashion grounds, from whence artes might be coyn’d”: Commerce and the Postlapsarian State in Greville’s Poetry'. Sidney Journal, 35 (1-2), 119-141. (In Press)

[img] Microsoft Word (Permanent embargo)
Cadman - Greville Commerce [FINAL].docx - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License All rights reserved.

Download (55kB)
Official URL: http://www.sidneysociety.org/?page_id=30

Abstract

A recurring theme in the literary works of Fulke Greville is the process of ‘declination’, Greville’s term for the progressive and irrevocable corruption of humanity and its political institutions. Yet, in contrast to the related apparatuses of the early modern state, Greville represents the emergence of commercial enterprise as a divine gift designed to help a fallen humanity rise above its debased condition. Such a view is coupled with his pragmatic support for commercial relations between nations as a means of maintaining international peace. This article argues that such emphases in Greville’s works provoke a number of ambiguities that arise as he attempts to accommodate pragmatic economic policy within the framework of ‘declination’ and in his Calvinist-influenced narrative of the development of the postlapsarian political state. Such ambiguities arise from the ways in which virtuous and industrious commercial activity will be adopted by a lapsed humanity and will inevitably come to act as a bulwark supporting the compromised institution of monarchy.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Humanities Research Centre
Departments: Development and Society > Humanities
Depositing User: Daniel Cadman
Date Deposited: 06 Apr 2017 10:19
Last Modified: 13 Jun 2017 13:58
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15500

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics