Pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement in Greek university students: differences between users and non-users in social cognitive variables, burnout and engagement

LAZURAS, Lambros, YPSILANTI, Antonia, LAMPROU, Efthymios and KONTOGIORGIS, Christos (2017). Pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement in Greek university students: differences between users and non-users in social cognitive variables, burnout and engagement. Substance Use and Misuse, 52 (7), 950-958.

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Link to published version:: 10.1080/10826084.2016.1267223

Abstract

Pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement (PCE) represents the non-medical use of prescribed medication for the improvement of cognitive functioning and academic performance. Although there are some studies about PCE prevalence, it is less clear how users and non-users of PCE substances differ with respect to their positive and negative student experiences (e.g., academic burnout, engagement with studies) and in social cognitive variables that relate to decision-making and self-regulation of PCE use. The present study assessed whether students with different experiences of PCE substance use displayed differences in academic burnout, study engagement and social cognitive variables relevant to PCE use. Three hundred and forty seven University students (M age = 22.15, SD = 1.69; 54% females) completed a battery of anonymous questionnaires on academic burnout, engagement with studies, social cognitive variables relevant to PCE use, and self-reported use of PCE substances and non-prescribed nutritional supplements. Three user groups emerged, namely, non-users (51.9%, n = 180), single users of non-prescribed dietary supplements (25.4%, n = 88), and dual users of both non-prescribed dietary supplements and PCE (22.8%, n = 79). Multivariate analysis of variance indicated significant differences among the three user groups in intentions, attitudes, social norms, and anticipated regret towards PCE use. No significant differences were observed with respect to academic burnout and work engagement. The findings show that University students may engage in PCE use independently of their student experiences. Rather, a chemically-assisted performance enhancement mindset seems to differentiate users from non-users of PCE substances.

Item Type: Article
Departments: Development and Society > Psychology, Sociology and Politics
Identification Number: 10.1080/10826084.2016.1267223
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Antonia Ypsilanti
Date Deposited: 04 Jan 2017 11:48
Last Modified: 27 Jul 2017 21:05
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/14509

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