Exploring religious involvement, forgiveness, trust, and cynicism

MACASKILL, A. (2007). Exploring religious involvement, forgiveness, trust, and cynicism. Mental health, religion, and culture, 10 (3), 203-218.

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Link to published version:: 10.1080/13694670600616092

Abstract

Forgiveness is a core value within Christianity and many other religions, but it is unclear whether valuing forgiveness results in individuals being more forgiving. This study examines the effect of Christian religious belief on forgiveness; tests the theoretical speculation that trust fosters forgiveness; explores the effect of cynicism, and examines age effects on forgiveness with a British sample. Christian clergy (N = 209), general population samples of Christians (N = 176), and a group with NRA (N = 65) completed the Heartland Forgiveness Scale measuring forgiveness of self, others, and situations, and measures of trust, cynicism, and the importance of forgiveness. The clergy score higher on total forgiveness, forgiveness of self, others, and situations; rate forgiveness as being more important; are more trusting; and are less cynical than the Christian and no religious affiliation (NRA) samples in the general population. While the Christian sample value forgiveness more than the NRA group, they are not more forgiving on any of the measures tested. Age is a significant predictor only for situational forgiveness. Trust is not a positive mediator of forgiveness for any of the participant groups, and neither is cynicism a negative mediator of forgiveness.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Psychology Research Group
Identification Number: 10.1080/13694670600616092
Depositing User: Ann Betterton
Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2008
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2009 18:22
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/119

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