Hard to reach and easy to ignore: The drinking careers of young people not in education, employment or training.

NELSON, Peter and TABERRER, Sharon (2015). Hard to reach and easy to ignore: The drinking careers of young people not in education, employment or training. Child and Family Social Work. (In Press)

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Official URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cfs.122...
Link to published version:: 10.1111/cfs.12260

Abstract

Young people’s drinking in the UK remains a matter of medical, social, media and political concern. The notion of transition and drinking styles in the move from childhood to adulthood and education to employment has been central to understanding young people's drinking behaviour but little is known about how the drinking patterns of those not in education or employment both men and women, develop over time. This paper reports on research which aimed to examine the current drinking habits and drinking careers of young people not in education employment and training who are traditionally described as hard to reach. In depth qualitative interviews were undertaken with 23 young people; 15 women and 8 men aged between 14 to 23. The findings are presented in respect of three stages of drinking; starting, continuing or increasing, and decreasing or stopping. The conclusions indicate that for the majority of these young people alcohol is a significant factor in their lives and that peers, gender, time and place combine to structure both their current alcohol use and drinking career. The paper argues that an understanding of young people’s drinking career development and current alcohol use will help target effective social work and multi-agency intervention. Keywords : alcohol; education; employment; social work; young people.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Health and Social Care Research
Identification Number: 10.1111/cfs.12260
Depositing User: Pete Nelson
Date Deposited: 22 Dec 2015 10:37
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2016 22:46
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/11088

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