Cognitive appraisals and psychological distress following venous thromboembolic disease: an application of the theory of cognitive adaptation

MOORE, T., NORMAN, P., HARRIS, P. R. and MAKRIS, M. (2006). Cognitive appraisals and psychological distress following venous thromboembolic disease: an application of the theory of cognitive adaptation. Social Science and medicine, 63 (9), 2395-2406.

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Link to published version:: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.06.014

Abstract

Venous thrombosis is a common and life-threatening disease that has received little attention in health psychology. The present study applied the theory of cognitive adaptation (TCA) to examine patients’ reactions to venous thrombosis. Patients (N=123) aged 16–84 recruited from anticoagulation units in the north of England completed measures of TCA constructs (meaning, mastery, self-esteem and optimism) and various outcome variables (anxiety, depression, thrombosis worries and quality of life) within 1 month of their thrombosis. The TCA explained large and significant amounts of variance in the outcome variables. In line with expectations, mastery, self-esteem and optimism were associated with positive adjustment. However, meaning was associated with elevated levels of distress. The results are discussed in relation to the search for meaning and the use of different control strategies in the early phases of adaptation to thrombosis.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: venous thrombosis, cognitive adaptation, depression, anxiety, quality of life
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Psychology Research Group
Identification Number: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.06.014
Depositing User: Ann Betterton
Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2008
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2009 18:22
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/108

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