The economic benefits of increasing kangaroo skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding in neonatal units : analysis of a pragmatic intervention in clinical practice.

LOWSON, K, OFFER, C, WATSON, Julie, MCGUIRE, B and RENFREW, M J (2015). The economic benefits of increasing kangaroo skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding in neonatal units : analysis of a pragmatic intervention in clinical practice. International Breastfeeding Journal, 10 (11), 1-11.

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Link to published version:: 10.1186/s13006-015-0035-8

Abstract

A number of significant recent research studies have used techniques of economic modelling to demonstrate potential benefits of increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK overall, and specifically in neonatal care. This paper complements this growing body of evidence by presenting an economic analysis of data from an actual intervention, the @Getting it Right from the Start' programme, which took place in the north of the UK (across Yorkshire and the Humber) during 2011-2013, with the aim of increasing breastfeeding (BF) and kangaroo skin-to-skin care (KC) in neonatal units. Results overall, the economic analysis demonstrated that for every £1 invested in the intervention to increase KC and BF rates, between £4.00 and £13.83 of benefit was generated. This was spread across different health care settings and the timescale for the realisation of benefits will vary. This was one of a first economic evaluations of an actual intervention to increase BF and KC in neonatal units. Economic evaluation should be more frequently included in studies of practical interventions in clinical settings to increase breastfeeding. Authors:Lowson K, Offer C, Watson J, McGuire W, Renfrew MJ (2015)

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Published online 2015 Mar 20 Collaborative publication: in 2011-2013 I was project lead at University of York for neonatal workstream.
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Health and Social Care Research
Identification Number: 10.1186/s13006-015-0035-8
Depositing User: Julie Watson
Date Deposited: 18 Jun 2015 14:00
Last Modified: 24 Aug 2015 08:21
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10312

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