I can't get no sleep : discussing #insomnia on twitter

JAMISON-POWELL, Sue, LINEHAN, Conor, DALEY, Laura, GARBETT, Andrew and LAWSON, Shaun (2012). I can't get no sleep : discussing #insomnia on twitter. In: CHI '12 : Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, ACM, 1501-1510.

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Official URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2208612
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1145/2207676.2208612
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    Abstract

    Emerging research has shown that social media services are being used as tools to disclose a range of personal health information. To explore the role of social media in the discussion of mental health issues, and with particular reference to insomnia and sleep disorders, a corpus of 18,901 messages - or Tweets - posted to the microblogging social media service Twitter were analysed using a mixed methods approach. We present a content analysis which revealed that Tweets that contained the word “insomnia” contained significantly more negative health information than a random sample, strongly suggesting that individuals were making disclosures about their sleep disorder. A subsequent thematic analysis then revealed two themes:coping with insomnia, and describing the experience of insomnia. We discuss these themes as well as the implications of our research for those in the interaction design community interested in integrating online social media systems in health interventions.

    Item Type: Book Section
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Psychology Research Group
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1145/2207676.2208612
    Page Range: 1501-1510
    Depositing User: Sue Jamison-Powell
    Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2015 09:22
    Last Modified: 26 May 2017 08:36
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10259

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