Incidence and predictors of new-onset constipation during acute hospitalisation after stroke

LIM, S.-F., ONG, S. Y., TAN, Y. L., NG, Y. S., CHAN, Y. H. and CHILDS, Charmaine (2015). Incidence and predictors of new-onset constipation during acute hospitalisation after stroke. International Journal of Clinical Practice, 69 (4), 422-428.

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Link to published version:: 10.1111/ijcp.12528


Objectives: We investigated new-onset constipation in patients with stroke compared with orthopaedic conditions and explored the predictors associated with constipation during acute hospitalisation. Methods: This was a prospective matched cohort study of 110 patients comparing stroke patients (n = 55) with orthopaedic patients (n = 55) admitted to a large tertiary acute hospital. Both cohorts were matched by age and sex. The incidence of new-onset constipation which occurred during a patient's acute hospitalisation was determined. Demographics, comorbidity, clinical factors, laboratory parameters and medications were evaluated as possible predictors of constipation. Results: The incidence of new-onset constipation was high for both stroke (33%) and orthopaedic patients (27%; p = 0.66). Seven stroke patients (39%) and four orthopaedic patients (27%) developed their first onset of constipation on day 2 of admission. Mobility gains (RR 0.741, p < 0.001) and the use of prophylactic laxatives (RR 0.331, p < 0.01) had a protective effect against constipation. Bedpan use (RR 2.058, p < 0.05) and longer length of stay (RR 1.032, p < 0.05) increased the risk of developing new-onset constipation. Conclusions: New-onset constipation is common among patients admitted for stroke and orthopaedic conditions during acute hospitalisation. The early occurrence, on day 2 of admission, calls for prompt preventive intervention for constipation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Article first published online: 6 FEB 2015
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Health and Social Care Research
Identification Number: 10.1111/ijcp.12528
Depositing User: Hilary Ridgway
Date Deposited: 24 Feb 2015 09:16
Last Modified: 20 Aug 2015 13:03

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